Community Pool Hoa, blue pool and a railing to enter the pool

Suggested Community Pool Guidelines for HOA Leaders During COVID- 19

 Community Pool Hoa, blue pool and a railing to enter the poolAs local governments across North Texas start lifting stay-at-home orders, many property managers of HOA and apartment communities are feeling pressure from their residents to open their community’s amenities. This particularly applies to community pools as summer is now upon us.

But there is some trepidation amongst community leaders to do so, specifically
because of the liability issues that arise with their insurance companies. Most
insurance policies are probably unclear on their standards of liability when it
comes to national diseases such as COVID 19 as this is a trial unprecedented in our lifetime.

While we here at Classic Construction do not presume to be experts on what
insurance policies will and will not cover, we can say that we encourage you as a
property manager to speak with the insurance company and determine these
things.

In the meantime, if the pressure from your residents to open the community pool
becomes too great to resist, we have some guidelines that should help you stay in
compliance with the CDC pool guidelines and with social distancing.

First, consider setting up blocks of time for pool access that your residents can
sign up for. This will help you control the number of residents who enter the pool
area at one time and comply with social distancing. Additionally, you might be
able to further mitigate your liability risk by having residents sign a release of
liability waiver before entering the pool area, as well as posting signs reminding
citizens of the social distancing protocol.

Second, consider how you will adjust your sanitation policies to accommodate the
new pool policies. Will you reduce the amount of pool furniture available so that
it can be spaced approximately 6 feet apart? And will you clean and disinfect the
furniture between each time block, or periodically during each time block while
residents swim?

lifeguard at community pool sitting in white chair with red flotie in his lap Lastly, consider the staffing requirements you might have were these policies put into place. While the community might already have a staff of trained lifeguards, we do not suggest asking your lifeguards to perform multiple tasks in addition to watching the pool. This means you might consider hiring staff to document who enters the pool according to your time blocking chart, to collect the liability waivers, and who clean and disinfect all pool furniture and equipment.

If you find that you are able to withstand the pressure from residents to open the community pool, take a moment to consider what repairs can or should be made to your pool area before you do open it. The most common projects we at Classic have performed over the years include repairs to the wrought iron or other
fencing surrounding the pool, as well as surfacing and deck repairs.

Construction engineers discussion with architects at construction or building site

What you need to know about working with insurance companies

Catastrophe strikes at the most inopportune times. Dealing with insurance for repairs as a property owner of a multifamily property or HOA building can become tricky and confusing, making repairs after a storm a daunting task.

Interacting with insurance companies is inevitable and will be necessary to get the repairs started. To help aid through this journey, we have detailed a few things that you will need to know.

The owners will need to notify the insurance company

Construction engineers discussion with architects at construction or building site

The first step is to notify the insurance company that there’s been some damage to the property. Most policies will state a specific time frame for reporting damages and if your people fail to report them within this time frame, it might result in the denial of the claim.

Even if your residents have to leave the property for safety reasons, the owner or HOA Board president will still need to reach out to the insurance company within the specified amount of time.

Make sure your owner or Board member has many photos that clearly detail the damage, as well as comprehensive notes and remarks that they can provide the insurance company with. The insurance world is all about the little details so be very thorough.

The insurance company will likely want to send an adjuster from their own firm to handle that portion of the process, know that this person doesn’t always have the best interests of the owner or Board in mind.

In case you are unaware,  your people have the right to hire a public insurance adjuster. In the case that you decide to hire a public adjuster, make sure they are trustworthy and can help get the most from the insurance company.

Find out what your budget is going to be

The insurance adjuster will let your insurance agent know what needs to be repaired or replaced and how much it will cost. This is why it’s so important to look for an adjuster that has your property owner’s best interests at heart.

When you get this report, know that the adjuster is only going to repair or replace what was already on the property with comparable materials. If the owner or the homeowners of a HOA want any upgrades to the property, these will likely be coming out of their own pockets.

It will be your job to find a contractor

Not all contractors are equal. You might be tempted to go straight to your preferred vendor list when looking for someone to help you fix up the property, but that might be a mistake.

When it comes to insurance claims, you’ll need to look for a contractor company that is used to working with people in the insurance industry. Typically, these contractors are known as restoration contractors.

Restoration contractors have years of experience and the knowledge necessary to repair homes that have been damaged by fire, water, smoke or wind. In these situations, it is essential to keep in mind that there is a distinct difference between restoring a damaged home as opposed to remodeling or renovating an existing home. General contractors are not nearly as familiar with the insurance claim procedure.

Classic Construction & Restoration Inc. is one of North Texas’ most well-known restoration contractors. If you’d like more information on navigating an insurance claim or on restoration project, please give us a call today.

 

Sources:

https://www.adjustersinternational.com/newsroom/hiring-a-contractor-for-your-property-damage-insurance-claim-tips-for-home-and-business-owners

https://www.adjustersinternational.com/newsroom/how-to-file-a-homeowners-property-damage-insurance-claim

https://www.insurance.wa.gov/hiring-general-contractor-homeowner-insurance-claims

https://www.millerpublicadjusters.com/free-property-insurance-claim-advice-blog/insurance-company-contractor

https://www.builtrighthomesolutions.com/about-us/news-and-events/22281-whats-the-difference-restoration-vs-general-contractors.html